Key factors to consider when deciding which psychometrics to use

  • Don’t be ripped off – the psychometrics market is saturated with hundreds of companies offering ‘the best psychometric yet’. With many companies selling psychometrics which have not been scientifically proven as valid and reliable, you may end up buying a tool that is no more a help than palm reading. Only take advice from a business psychologist.
  • Psychometrics are most powerful when used in combination with eachother. For example if you are using psychometrics for recruitment we would advise you use a psychometric to measure ability and also a personality and/or motivation tool. When you measure more than one aspect of an individual you increase the accuracy of your hire decision
  • Use psychometrics in tandem to other selection techniques such as structured business interviews, behavioural capability assessment and technical competency. Again, you will increase the accuracy of your hire decision significantly if you use psychometrics alongside at least 1 other selection tool.
  • Interpreting the psychometric reports requires specialist knowledge. Only interpret the reports if you have the relevant qualifications to do so.
  • Providing feedback to candidates taking psychometrics is one of the best ways to keep candidates engaged during a recruitment/selection process. If they know they will get a degree of feedback on their psychometrics then they are more likely to be positive about spending the time upfront in completing them.

Before selecting a particular psychometric test, you should cover off the below questions with your test provider:

  • How reliable is the test and how consistent is it as a measure?
  • How valid is the test and does it really identify the attributes or skills which the supplier claims?
  • What evidence can suppliers provide that their tests do not unfairly disadvantage certain groups?
  • Will the test seem appropriate to those taking it and what have previous reactions been to this test?
  • Has the test been used effectively in similar circumstances?
  • Are the norms provided by the supplier for comparative purposes up to date and appropriate for the user's requirements? Do the norm results apply to a sufficiently representative mix of occupations, gender or ethnic groups to allow fair comparison with the user's group?
  • Is the method of test evaluation and scoring appropriate to the purpose for which the test will be used?

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